Project Bucket List

Or should that read “Bucket List Project”?

A friend and I were chatting the other day and I mentioned I have enough crafting supplies to keep me occupied for at least the next year or so. Sadly. 🙂

New catalogs are coming, new stuff is being released. You know the drill.

For those who are thinking ahead, however, it might be a good time to look at merchandise that is being discontinued and/or is on sale. You can get a head start on next year’s cards, tags, pages, sewing, decorating, etc.

The sad part of this is with the usual holiday gift buying insanity, there is less in the bank (or on the plastic) to devote to craft items/ideas. Unless, of course, you planned ahead on that, too.

For myself, I’m looking at some smaller projects.

A few years ago, I lucked out and bought a well loved, but no longer needed buffet that is the perfect height and size for my TV. Sadly, as often happens when one is not prepared, when I put the buffet in the right place and started to put the TV on it, I had to grab the first thing I could get my hands on to put under the TV so it wouldn’t scratch the buffet.

As I look at it now, I am seeing the beginnings of an idea for a table runner type project that might have pockets on the ends for remote controls. (That way they don’t get up and hide…)

Maybe I could include the pocket into the design for the blocks at the ends of the runner? Since the TV actually covers a bit of space in the middle, it makes little sense to make blocks that no one will see.

Will have to consider that further.

I have had two Accuquilt dies on my desk for at least a month now. One is the original Bow Tie Block designed by Alex Anderson and the other is the original multipurpose die that was part of the accessories with the Go! cutter. Both make 4 inch blocks.

Every once in a while I pull them out and look at the enclosed patterns (always included with Accuquilt dies) thinking about possibilities.

As the year winds down, I am less inclined to think big. I’m contemplating smaller, more manageable projects that can be finished quickly. That way I feel like I’ve accomplished something, right?

Tell me what you have on your Project Bucket List. Maybe we can share notes?

Thinking About: Quilting?

My Quilting Journey

Someone recently reached out wanting to learn how to quilt and asked for help &/or advice.

I had never really thought about it before. 🙂

Disclaimer: I am not a teacher. What follows is my particular journey into the craft of quilting.

I’m a life long viewer of crafting shows. I’ve spent years watching Fons and Porter on PBS, not to mention a host of other, well, hosts. Nancy Zieman (Sewing with Nancy) was probably my tipping point, although I couldn’t really say what gave me that push.

You see, up until That Point, I had never owned a sewing machine, could do Very Basic hand sewing; sewing a button or a hem, and had Absolutely No Interest in anything related. Period.

My mom was a seamstress. She made my sister’s prom dresses and a suit that was fully lined. She made my clothes and most of hers, too. Heck, at the time she passed she was attempting to learn to make shirts for my dad.

Looking back, I really don’t know if it was a Necessary Skill or one she really enjoyed. Mom did a lot of crafting, but she never made a quilt. There was one summer she spent making aprons out of fabric scraps…

Back in 2011 I came across Mary Fons on YouTube with her Quilty videos and was intrigued. Here was a young(er) person who was interested in the craft, not surprising considering her background, but learning/teaching it in a way that was not like anything I’d ever seen before. Hmm.

Somewhere along that time I caught an episode of Sewing With Nancy where she was putting together a strip quilt. In my mind, the light bulb came on when she talked about sewing. “If you can drive a straight line, you can sew one.” I believe she said. At least, that is what I remember.

Me, being me, I bought my first sewing machine, along with a crafting table, ordered a copy of Nancy’s book on the lessons and dove in. Head first.

But that’s me.

I love my sewing machines – yes, plural. Both my machines are Brother, the second was designed with the extra bells and whistles for quilters. Both are excellent beginner machines and perfect for me. I might have drooled over the more expensive brands, but bank balance has always had an impact on reality.

When I started out, I followed what I was seeing from the teachers I watched. I bought rulers and tools that I knew would help me do the job. I subscribed to a couple of magazines and online classes that helped teach me basics.

What I discovered is that my tendency to jump into the deep end of the pool, while not always a bad thing, was not a great way to start out. My first attempt at a quilt is still in the UFO pile, and likely to be recut to be used elsewhere. If at all.

UFO = Unfinished Object

On the other hand, I discovered precuts and my life got measurably better. Quilting precuts are bundles of fabric cut into standard shapes and sizes. Each precut fabric bundle features coordinating fabrics from a designer’s collection.

Each collection is designed to work together, so I don’t have to spend hours fussing and fretting choosing each individual fabric. They are cost effective, too. Depending upon the quilting pattern you are working with, there can be zero waste.

You see, somewhere along the line, I discovered that I hate cutting fabric. Well, maybe “hate” is a bit too strong, but for me to put rotary cutter to fabric is an exercise in fearlessness.

I can not stand and lean over a table for very long, my lower back can’t handle it. Cutting yard goods over time is, frankly, painful. Add into that the occasional whim of the ruler or template to move creating a bad cut, which can lead to a fabric shortage, and you start to see where I had to find an alternative.

Accurate cuts make accurate quilt blocks.

Accuquilt to the rescue!

I love my Accuquilt Go cutter and dies. That investment changed the way I quilt and made my quilting life so much easier and less stressful.

Why: The dies are already set up with the 1/4 inch seam allowance and the dog ears have been removed during the cutting process so all I have to do is maintain my 1/4 inch seam when I sew. No trimming dog ears! My blocks are ALWAYS accurate as long as my sewing isn’t sloppy.

Yes, I use my Accuquilt to further cut my precuts.

While I could go out and buy yard goods, I do prefer my precuts and have been known to get some fat quarters

Fat Quarter = One quarter of a yard of fabric. For quilters, it is usually cut in a square shape, rather than a strip off the end of a bolt.

The Quilting Police

Let’s take a minute to touch on a bit of reality here.

There are all sorts of ways to go about the process to create a quilt. Some folks like to make their own plastic templates. Some like to use rulers. Some love their machines, while others prefer to do a lot of hand work.

Pretty much, you can find a way to create that quilt you are dreaming about in a variety of methods and there will always be someone out there who is more than happy to provide help and guidance on how to do it.

The trick is to realize that not everyone is good at, or wants to do, someone else’s method.

Personally, I’ve never come across anyone who would pick apart my work to point out a flaw. Not that there haven’t been quite a few…

Most people will look at a quilt and be caught up in the pattern and the colors – and most of them won’t have a clue about a missed seam or a badly pressed block (unless it is Really Badly Pressed), they will just be wowed at the end product.

Which is as it should be.

Quilting is not an inexpensive hobby. Depending upon the way you choose to do yours, there is the investment in tools and equipment. Fabric is also not inexpensive. Good quality quilting fabric can set you back quite a bit depending upon the project. Like, $100.00 plus for a bed sized quilt. And we won’t begin to discuss the cost per hour to actually do the process of making the quilt.

There is also the need for space to put the quilt together: Top, batting and backing.

Longarmer = Longarm quilting is the process by which a longarm sewing machine is used to sew together a quilt top, quilt batting and quilt backing into a finished quilt.

Once that is done, you will either need to quilt it yourself or send it out to be quilted. Not inexpensive, but a great option once you find a good longarmer.

Some folks get stuck doing bindings. If you find a longarmer who will do that for you, fantastic!

Quilting can be a long term project. Very few people can spend entire days doing just quilting, so if you are embarking on a bed sized quilt, you can reasonably expect to spend a few months at the very least.

“Quilt in a day!” is a great concept, but even Eleanor Burns acknowledges that the process usually takes more than a day.

Speaking of Eleanor, she was also one of my teachers. I learned a lot from her.

I enjoy the process of quilting. It can be very zen-like. I enjoy the geometry of it. As Mary Fons talked about, it is a great way to create order when the world around you is in chaos.

I love watching Missouri Star Quilt Company and The Midnight Quilter videos on YouTube and Bluprint. Stuart Hillard has expanded his online presence beyond Create and Craft and his patterns and teaching methods are very calming.

If you are interested in learning the craft, why not check those references I mentioned, but also your local quilt guilds. Your local quilt shop, or sewing shop, will more than likely have a few contacts to help you along.

For myself, I don’t know if I will make a bed sized quilt again. I have a couple of lap sized or twin sized tops ready to be quilted. At this point, I’m thinking I might be more inclined towards small projects like wall hangings or table toppers. Time will tell.

My fabric stash will keep me busy for a while yet. 🙂

A Few Thoughts

  • If you can drive a straight line, you can sew one.
  • You don’t need to spend a lot of money in the beginning.
  • Find teachers who communicate with you. If what they say makes sense, it is worth the time you’ve spent listening.
  • Start small at the beginning.
  • Fabric comes is a huge variety of colors, patterns, designs, etc. There is a lot to play with there.
  • Plan on spending a lot of time doing the process. “Quick” is relative.

A quilt is a gift of love. It doesn’t matter how professional it looks or if it wins any prizes, the simple act of creating a warm space for someone is an act of love.

Enjoy the process.

Tackling UFOs

R U Stuck Creatively?

In the crafting world “UFO” means Unfinished Objects. Usually a quilt or large project that has been left to sit for various reasons.

In the rest of the world, I think UFO refers to those things on a seemingly unending To Do List that never seem to get done.

I’m guilty of this. Big (or maybe not so big) projects that I really need to do simply to answer a question or two, let alone resolve a cleaning issue. Cleaning out and inventorying my pantry, for example.

I can have a better handle on meal planning when I know what I have on hand and what I need to purchase.

Recharge your creative batteries!

I’m beginning to think that one of the biggest hurdles to moving forward with Change is tackling the left overs and clearing the decks.

There are always the general day-to-day things that we do simply to keep moving; food, dishes, laundry, trash, etc. But even within those tasks are tasks that keep being pushed to the “I’ll do it later” stack.

More than just clearing the decks, however, tackling UFOs opens up space to be creative. It gets rid of those things that are preventing you from trying new things.

Lots of us get stuck in the rut of “I can’t start anything new until I finish all my pending stuff.” or some such.

Could this be considered self-sabotage?

Can’t start the New Eating Plan until all the old food is eaten.

Can’t start the New Craft Project until all the old projects are done.

Can’t find a New Series to Watch until I’ve caught up with all the old ones.

A few years ago I spent a couple of weeks away from home recovering from surgery. As such, my regular TV schedule was put by the wayside and I lost momentum with several series. Turns out, I had the opportunity to catch up, but didn’t.

Recently, for various reasons, my TV viewing schedule has been put on the sidelines, not because I can’t, but because I don’t want to keep up.

If you’ve been with me for any length of time, you know how dedicated I can be to those few shows I keep up with. This change has been unsettling and interesting.

I’ve spent time focusing on classes, checking out new videographers, exploring topics I had previously had only a passing interest in.

As a result of this, I’ve rekindled an interest in a craft I’d put aside and am now contemplating tackling again. I gathered new material to use when I’m ready. I’ve added information that I can use later.

By clearing out my “I have to do this” list, I made room for the “I might want to do this” list.

To put it another way, by cleaning out the closet, I’ve made room for new things.

If you are stuck, in whatever version of “creativity” you prefer, maybe you need to consider that not all projects left unfinished need to be “finished” and that you can give yourself permission to either hand them off or leave them be and go on to the next.

Keep It Simple

How to Keep Your Interest Without Becoming Overwhelmed

I love the excitement of finding some thing new that I want to try or read or watch or… Well, you get the idea. 🙂

The problem is, life has a way of interrupting the excitement and sometimes I lose track of that Wonderful Whatever to the point where I forget what made me excited about it in the first place.

I love history, films, music, TV, books, and loads of other things.

My crafting is pretty simple – I’ve been known to put a project down for years (really) only to pick it up and finally finish it. That is one reason my crafting has to be simple. Complicated projects could be sidelined for so long as to be unfinishable.

I love to crochet, but I do it so infrequently I have to relearn every single time. Really.

I’m also the person who jumps in a few yards ahead of where I probably should start.

I started my first quilting projects not by sewing simple squares together, but sewing hand cut half hexagons and triangles.

I dare add that my foray into sewing was a (thankfully) brief project for Home Economics class in High School that didn’t exactly work out. <cough>

Back to the quilting, while jumping into the middle, if not the deep end, of the pool might not be the best idea ever, I did learn a lot. And I gained quite a few tools. And fabric.

My card making is, deliberately, not high end. I have loads of paper, tools, embellishments, etc., and I enjoy the process, but I am still learning.

I love to cook and bake, but as I’m only feeding me, my major creativity tends to be … tampered a bit. I like being able to wear a smaller size than I used to. 🙂

What I love about watching DIY and How To videos is not just the fascination with the various projects but the rekindling of excitement for a process.

If you are hesitant about starting a new project, or if yourself stuck might I suggest a thought?

Start small.

You may want to dive in and create the most amazing 15 layer wedding cake that you can see in your imagination, but if you have little to no actual baking experience…maybe that might be a project best done in future.

I find scratch baking easy and enjoyable, but that’s me. I also know my limitations. While 15 layers could be a showstopper, I might actually start out with 2 just to see how the recipe works and if I need to do a bit of tweaking.

Those triangles and half hexagons I mentioned will soon be re-cut into new, smaller, shapes that I can use for other blocks in other projects.

Odd note about one of those fabric lines; by the time I finished cutting all those half hexagons I was mortally sick of the fabric. Sad, but true. When I pulled it out of the drawer recently, however, I found I loved it once again. The colors are beautiful, the patterns lovely and I was excited to think about how I would use it.

These days I’m less inclined (let alone interested) in making a full sized quilt and more interested in table runners, mug rugs and the like.

If you need to regain your excitement for anything, start slow, revisit what caught your attention and take smaller steps. Build on what you learn so when you face those 15 layers of cake with buttercream frosting it won’t be such a huge undertaking.

Life really is more about the journey rather than the destination. Take the time to enjoy the trip.

Quilter’s Corner

Reigniting The Flame

I enjoy quilting, I really do. There is something satisfying about putting pieces together to make beautiful blocks to make beautiful quilts. I just don’t enjoy cutting fabric. Which is why I own an Accuquilt Go!. 🙂

I have been a Novice Quilter for years. Like many of the things I like to do, I don’t do them often enough to move beyond “novice”. Like most of them; fabric painting and I have had a life long love affair and even when I’ve been away from it for long periods (aka: Years) I’m beyond ‘novice’.

I’ve been away from the quilting table for a while now. Recently, however, I found myself mesmerized by Stuart Hillard on YouTube. I first found him when he was working with Accuquilt and Create and Craft in the U.K. His easy and interesting tutorials on a variety of machines and blocks were, well, comfortable.

I’m no beginner when it comes to using the machine and the dies, but the ability to sit through a refresher course gave me a touch of inspiration and – dare I say it? – inclination to pull out some fabric and dive in.

Even without the machine and the dies, watching the Missouri Star Quilt Company videos each week provides a lot of inspiration and not a few “Ah Ha!” moments. Miss Jenny always has something interesting to share!

The Midnight Quilt Show posts on YouTube as well as Bluprint. I try not to miss an episode, even if I’m not inclined toward the pattern. I always learn something new. I like how she shows how to do quilting on a home sewing machine.

While I’m thinking of it, Donna Jordan from Jordan Fabrics has become a Must See when I come across one of their YouTube videos. Donna always has interesting ideas, great patterns and some seriously luscious fabrics. 🙂

Much to Miss Bella’s consternation, I just reorganized part of the library/craft room so I have access to my fabric stash. She now has to determine how to get back onto her spot. Me? I now have access to loads of fabrics to play with.

Yippee!

A Gameplan for Pretty Much Everything

It = Holiday meals, decorations, presents, whatever.

This is the time of year when people tend to start getting a bit crazy trying to either keep up with [fill in the blank] or satisfy other people’s expectations.

Sound familiar?

All this year, the recurring theme I’ve heard is “You Do You”. And, do you know what? I think there is something to be celebrated for that.

You Do You means you choose what you want to do, see, wear, make, etc. If you choose to follow family traditions, great. However, if you want to strike out on your own and try new things, why not? There is nothing wrong with expanding the envelope, shall we say? There is also nothing wrong with adding new things into old traditions. How do you think those traditions became traditions in the first place?

So, as you start thinking about your holiday preparations, if you come across a thought that starts with something like “I wish we could…” stop and think about why it can, or can’t, be done.

You might find out that some people feel a bit left out because one side (or group) has “always” done the whatever.

You might find that by sharing or letting someone else do it, you have more time to enjoy the process or the holiday or the whatever.

You Do You can carry over into non holiday things, too. Bottom line: Don’t be afraid to try and make yourself happy. Learn a few things, try new things, do (or don’t) new things. Get rid of old ideas that no longer work. Sort of like cleaning out your mental closet. The goal is to create a life that is enjoyable and comfortable.

Stopping to Inhale Some New Stuff

Or, I’m really enjoying my online classes and tutorials. 🙂

I admit it; I’m a DIY junkie.

I love to learn new things – even if I doubt I will ever use that knowledge. I’ve seen most, if not all, of the 40 odd seasons of This Old House, after all. Along the way I learned a lot, gained an appreciation for the folks who do that work for a living, applauded a lot of home owners who weren’t afraid to roll up their sleeves.

The interesting thing about watching DIY shows is it begins the process of recharging creative batteries. It really doesn’t matter what the task is, either.

I’ve watched bakers make the most amazing breads and teach the methods in such a way even I can do it. I’ve seen quilters use tools and fabrics in ways that inspire me to give it a try. I’ve learned more about things I already knew and gained insight into things that confused me.

I was recently introduced to a Canadian DIY home decorator by Hermione Chantal, who lives in England. Both ladies have taught me a lot, given me things to consider and broadened my interest in the topic.

That they also manage to share some insight into living in their particular parts of the world is added bonus. 🙂

I’m off to delve back into my shows. In the meantime, why not browse around YouTube or Bluprint and see what you can find that whets your appetite?